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iTour Directions

*** Standing near the street with your back to City Hall and the fountain, you will have the Blue Cross Centre clock tower directly in front of you.  Turn east, or to your left while facing the clock tower, and proceed to the crosswalk located just after the overhead pedway that spans Main Street.  Signal your intent to cross Main Street and cross cautiously once all traffic has stopped.  Turn left and cross Mechanic Street.  Continue on Main Street, stopping near the intersection of Main Street and Assomption Boulevard.  Across Main Street, you will see our first site, the Bank of Montreal Building, located at 569 Main Street.

Bank of Montreal Building (567-569 Main Street)
Humphrey Block (599 Main Street)
Higgins Block (679-687 Main Street)
Royal Bank Building (713-721 Main Street)
Caledonia Building (795-797 Main Street)
Empire Block (801-805 Main Street)
Capitol Theatre (811 Main Street)
Victoria Block (817-831 Main Street)
R. N. Wyse Building (937-839 Main Street)
Subway Block (885-889 Main Street)
Flat Iron Building (897-899 Main Street)
Subway Structure (Main Street at Archibald Street)
Former A. A. Tuttle Building
Minto Building (196 Robinson Court)
Albion Block (844-852 Main Street)
Transcript Building (828 Main Street)
14 Church Street
Salvation Army Citadel (16 Church Street)
Central United Church (150 Queen Street)
First Moncton United Baptist Church (50 Church Street)
St. George's Anglican Church (51 Church Street)
Masonic Temple (115 Queen Street)
Aliant Tower (corner of Botsford and Queen)
St. Bernard's Rectory (43 Botsford Street)
St. Bernard's Church (43 Botsford Street)
Rand House (62 Botsford Street)
Times Building (18 Botsford Street)
Provincial Bank Building (696-698 Main Street)
McSweeney Building (700 Main Street)
Jordi Bonet Mural (720-730 Main Street)

 

Bank of Montreal Building (567-569 Main Street)

Located at the southeast corner of Main Street and Steadman Street, the Bank of Montreal Building is three-storey Italianate commercial structure in freestone masonry from the late-19th century.

In 1876, J. and C. Harris built the eastern half of the structure, with the western half added circa 1883, doubling its overall size. The boxy massing, the segmented arch openings and freestone masonry exemplify the Italianate style of this building. The Doric pilasters and slim Corinthian pillars are details that were common on many Bank of Montreal buildings at this time.

This building is a significant part of Moncton’s economic history. The eastern half of the building was originally built for the Bank of Montreal, the first major bank to open in Moncton. Although the Bank of Montreal relocated in 1891, the building has remained a prominent commercial location. 

Among the more significant occupants since the relocation of the bank were J. H. Harris & Co., the Commercial Hotel and Journal L’Évangéline. This was the first French language newspaper in the area and maintained its printing and publishing operations at this location for about 30 years.

The Bank of Montreal Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

***Backtrack on Main Street, going west away from Assomption Boulevard, until you are directly across Main Street from our next site, the Humphrey Block, located at 599 Main Street.

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Humphrey Block (599 Main Street)

The Humphrey Block, located on the north side of Main Street, was built in 1930 for W. A. Humphrey. W. A. Humphrey and Son acquired the first Ford dealership in Moncton and needed an appropriate showroom for their growing enterprise.  To serve that purpose, Mr. Humphrey had this block built.  It is an example of simple yet functional modern design typical of the first quarter of the 20th century in Moncton. The two-storey front section of the block housed the showrooms, while the single-storey rear of the building was used for the business’s garage. The Depression was very hard on the newly-emerging automobile industry and this dealership closed up shop circa 1940. Since its days as a car dealership, this block has continued to be a viable commercial space in the core of Moncton’s downtown.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the Humphrey Block, along Main Street until you are standing in front of Kramer’s Korner located at 700 Main Street.  Your next site will be across Main Street at 679-685 Main Street.

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Higgins Block (679-687 Main Street)

The Higgins Block is a three-storey Italianate commercial building in pink sandstone located on the northwest corner of Botsford Street and Main Street. This imposing structure is the best example of commercial Italianate architecture from the early 20th century on Main St.  Local lore has it that the sandstone details include a self-portrait of the original owner, Lester H. Higgins.

When his shoe and boot business warranted larger premises on Main St., Lester Higgins had the eastern portion of the Higgins Block erected in 1901. By the time the western portion was erected in 1909, his attention had shifted from retail to real estate. He would eventual construct many impressive retail and office blocks on Main St. The Higgins Block attracted many high profile tenants over the years, including the Moncton Public Library, the Canadian Bank of Commerce and Metropolitan Life Insurance.

The Higgins Block was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the Higgins Block.  Stop once you are directly across Main Street from 713 Main Street, located at the corner of Main and Alma.

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Royal Bank Building (713-721 Main Street)

Situated at the corner of Main and Alma streets, the Royal Bank Building is an impressive three-storey building in pink sandstone.

Started in 1898 and completed in 1899, this excellent example of Romanesque Revival commercial architecture was originally a branch of the Merchants’ Bank of Halifax, becoming the Moncton branch of the Royal Bank of Canada when the Merchants’ Bank changed its name in 1901. It remained a Royal Bank branch until 1986.

The building was designed by notable Halifax architect J. C. Dumaresq who also designed such iconic structures as the Legislative Assembly in Fredericton. Contractors James Reid & Son used pink sandstone acquired from a nearby Sackville quarry and the stone still retains some of the original tool marks. The corner orientation of the bank’s main entrance is indicative of the merchant bank style of this era, intending to capitalize on client traffic from two intersecting streets instead of just one. An extension to the north side of the building by Ambrose Wheeler in 1929 reflects the major elements of the original structure.

Along with its major financial tenants, the Royal Bank Building’s upper floors have been occupied by significant local businesses such as the noted law firms of former Moncton Mayor E. A. Reilly and those of R. W. Hewson, who remained at this location for almost 65 years. It has also served as home to the Masons and the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows who occupied the upper floors.

The Royal Bank Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the Royal Bank Building.  Stop in front of 828 Main Street, located across the intersection of Main and Westmorland.  The building located across the street at 795-797 Main Street is your next site.  

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Caledonia Building (795-797 Main Street)

In 1892, successful men’s clothier W. H. Faulkner revealed his plan to erect this large modern building on the north side of Main Street. The idea was to shake what he considered to be the “rural” look of the city.  The red brick and stone building originally had a flat roof.  However, sometime between 1905 and 1910, the present peaked roof was added.  The current siding conceals the original stonework of the front façade.

When prominent clothier J. D. Creaghan wanted to expand his enterprise into Moncton in 1905, he purchased the Caledonia Building along with all of its inventory.  It was during the first few years of Creaghan’s occupancy that major renovations were made to the building, making it a significant element in the look of Main Street.  Creaghan’s remained in the Caledonia Building until the 1990.  Due to its long association with the site, this building is also known as the Creaghan Building.

The Caledonia Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the Caledonia Building. Stop in front of 844 Main Street.  The next 2 sites will be directly across Main Street.

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Empire Block (801-805 Main Street)

Located at the corner of Main Street and Oak Park, the Empire Block is a three-storey brick and pink sandstone commercial Italianate building built in 1916.

This building was constructed for prolific retail property owner Lester H. Higgins. Designed by H. H. Mott of Saint John and built by contractors Amos Govang (anglicized Gauvin) and Docity LeBlanc, this structure was considered the epitome of modern office and retail space in the area at the time. Mr. Higgins named this building the “Empire Block” in honour of the British Commonwealth.  Other Higgins properties that were named in honour of the Commonwealth included the Liberty Block, the Imperial Block and the Victoria Block.  The construction date and the name of the building are clearly visible under the shaped parapet that adorns the roof.

Like the Empire Block, many of Mr. Higgins properties were soundly built and are currently in use as professional, retail and residential spaces. Among the many long-term occupants of the Empire Block, the most notable was F. W. S. Colpitts & Co. This clothing store was an original tenant on the ground floor and was a staple in this location until it relocated in 1971.

The Empire Block was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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Capitol Theatre (811 Main Street)

The Capitol Theatre is an Italianate opera house-style auditorium originally built in 1922 and rebuilt in 1926. The building facilitated cinema and live vaudeville acts and included the smaller auditorium venue on the second level at the rear known as the Empress Theatre. So unique was the concept of a single lobby serving the two venues that it was featured in the “Ripley’s Believe it or Not” newspaper serial.

The Capitol Theatre is the oldest surviving theatre in Moncton and is one of only three pre-World War II theatres in the province. It is also one of the only remaining theatres of this era that was designed by a Canadian architect, René-Arthur Fréchet. It is one of only eight theatres in Canada to be authentically and historically restored to its original 1920’s style. Restorations during the 1990s revealed frescos, gilding and stencilling by Emmanuel Briffa, one of the most sought-after theatre decorators in Canada at the time.

The Winters Family and Alexander R. Torrie created this entertainment venue to attract tours from some of the largest shows and traveling vaudeville acts. In 1929, The Capitol showed the very first “talking” film in Moncton, “The Donovan Affair”. As theatres across North America were being taken over by large, American-based movie chains, this theatre fought to retain its status as an independent venue through most of its existence.

The Capitol Theatre also holds particular importance to the history of firefighting in Moncton. A plaque in the lobby honours the only Moncton firefighter to lose his life in the line of duty. A. H. Lindsay died while trying to fight the blaze that gutted both the Capitol Theatre and adjoining Empress Theatre in 1926.

The Capitol Theatre was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the Capitol Theatre.  Cross the intersection of Main and Robinson streets and stop there.  This corner of Main and Robinson will be the stop for our next 2 sites located at 839 Main Street and 831 Main Street. 

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Victoria Block (817-831 Main Street)

The Victoria Block is a two-storey Italianate structure constructed of red brick with ornate parapets and wooden storefronts. It is located at the corner of Main Street and Robinson Court.
It was originally a roller skating rink built in 1884 for a business group from Calais, Maine, who formed the “Moncton Roller Rink Company”.  S. O. Sawyer of Calais, Maine was the architect and builder of the original structure. He used local contractors Lea, Rogers and Scott for various aspects of construction. The stepped parapets are part of the original roller rink design.

In 1916, prolific commercial property owner Lester H. Higgins expanded the building to accommodate retail space and apartments and changed the exterior from wood to brick. He would soon be forced to remodel a second time after fire gutted the interior.

Keating’s Tobacco Shop has occupied the prominent corner location since purchasing the Harold G. Cole Tobacco business in 1930. Harold G. Cole had been in this location since 1915.

The Victoria Block is a designated Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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R. N. Wyse Building (937-839 Main Street)

The R. N. Wyse Building is an early 20th century two-storey red brick commercial building located on the northwest corner of Main Street and Robinson Street.

It is a good example of commercial Italianate architecture, which is reflected in the stone details on the door and window openings, the Roman and segmented arch trim, the corbel brick patterns under the cornice and the overall rectangular massing. It was designed by Moncton architect W. C. Barnes and was completed in 1909 by local contractors, Builders’ Woodworking Co. Ltd.  The building was erected for the dry goods business of prominent Moncton businessman, Robert N. Wyse. Businesses along the east side of the building add to the unique commercial environment of Robinson Court.

The R. N. Wyse Building is a designated Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue west, or to your left while facing the R. N. Wyse Building.  Stop before crossing the intersection of Main and Foundry.  This will be our stop for the next three sites.

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Subway Block (885-889 Main Street)

The Subway Block, located on the north side of Main Street, just east of the Subway structure, is a three-storey, classically-inspired commercial building with a front façade in brick.

The current Subway Block building replaced a wooden structure in 1917 by the owner, George V. Steeves, and a second portion was completed in 1918. The intention was to create a better aesthetic and modern view for passengers passing by rail along the Subway viaduct structure, which was erected only a few years earlier. Among the more unique details of this building is the polygonal footprint, whose shape was dictated by the intersection of the railway and Main Street.

The classical storefront maintains numerous original decorative elements, including the brickwork at the cornice.

The Subway Block was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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Flat Iron Building (897-899 Main Street)

The Flat Iron Building is located on the north side of Main Street, adjacent to the Subway structure. It is a two-storey commercial building with a front façade in brick.

A pre-1888 wooden structure of similar design was replaced by this building in 1917 by the owner, J. D. LeBlanc, who operated a tailoring business here for many years. The concept was to design and create a better aesthetic and modern view for passengers passing by rail along the newly erected Subway structure. Its unique footprint was created by the intersection of the railway crossing and Main Street.

The Flat Iron Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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Subway Structure (Main Street at Archibald Street)

The Subway structure is a concrete railway viaduct completed in 1915. This structure was built to eliminate a dangerous multi-track level crossing that was responsible for countless accidents and even some fatalities. Although the General Manager of the Canadian Government Railways G. P. Glutelius and concerned citizens, such as Captain Masters fought for the Subway to be built, the final decision would only be made after Moncton’s first plebiscite.  Voters opted for the Subway.

The height of the structure was appropriate at the time of construction for vehicle traffic, including an electric tramway system.  Today, larger transport trucks and boom trucks invariably get stuck at least once a year.  This usually involves deflating the truck’s tires to free it!

Being a railway hub for the Maritimes, Moncton hosted annual Railroad Days celebrations.  Students would be selected to paint murals on the interior wall panels of the structure while most of Main Street was blocked off for festival activities.  From the 1970’s until the 1980’s, the Subway structure was actually painted bright pink!  This structure still stands as a monument to the former glory days of the railway industry in Moncton.

*** For your safety, please backtrack to the intersection of Main and Lutz.  You will want to make your way to the diagonally opposite corner of the intersection, eventually crossing both Lutz and Main streets.  Going east down Main Street, travelling away from the Subway Structure, stop in front of 859 Main Street. Your next site will be located directly across the street at 886 Main Street.

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Former A. A. Tuttle Building

The Former A. A. Tuttle Building, located at 880-886½ Main Street, consists of a wooden two-and-half-storey commercial building from the late 19th century. It is a lasting example of late 19th century vernacular Classical Revival architecture in Moncton. Its ground floor storefront faces north onto Main Street.

Since its construction in 1882 as a storefront for A. A. Tuttle’s funeral home business which later became Tuttle Bros. Limited, very little has changed in the overall architecture of the building. The clapboard siding, the front-facing gable roof and the layout of the storefront bulkheads reflect traditional elements of wooden commercial structures on Moncton’s Main Street during this era. Flanked by more modern structures, this wooden gem still has seaweed insulation in some of the rear storage areas, a long-lost building practice in the area.

The Tuttle Bros. funeral home business was an offshoot of A. A. Tuttle’s door and sash business. It has maintained itself as an industry leader in funeral services in the Maritime Provinces, establishing itself as the longest-running family owned company still in operation in Moncton. For many years, the upper floors of the building were used as a residence for several members of the Tuttle family. Several subsequent occupants of the building are also noteworthy. Shortly after the Tuttles’ occupancy of the building ended in the early 1920’s, Harry Hans Groceries would begin a decades-long tenure at this location. For more than 30 years, Harry Kirsh occupied a portion of the building to operate his clothing store. Mr. Kirsh, a Lithuanian immigrant, was one of the founding members of Tiferes Israel Synagogue, Moncton’s only Jewish congregation.

*** Continue east, or to your left when facing 886 Main Street.  Stop once you are in front of Robinson Court, adjacent to Keating’s Tobacco at 831 Main Street.  Proceed a little way up Robinson Court until you are standing in front of your next stop, 196 Robinson Street.

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Minto Building (196 Robinson Court)

The Minto Building, also known as the Minto Hotel Sample Rooms, is a three-storey brick commercial building from the early 20th century. It is located on the west side of Robinson Court and was built on the site of a previous wooden structure that was razed by fire in 1922. This Greek Revival-inspired building was erected by Ambrose Wheeler for hardware store owner Carl Doull. Notice the bold rectangular lintels over the windows and the brick quoins at the corners of the building, all signifying a classical design influence. This structure is a rare existing example of sample rooms for traveling commercial vendors to show their wares. These particular sample rooms were associated with the Minto Hotel, which had been located nearby on Main Street. The main floor, with its existing storefront layout, served as Mr. Doull’s hardware store.

During the period of the Scott Act in the 1920’s, Mr. Doull was found guilty of rum running out of this location. The authorities discovered a false foundation wall in the basement that concealed a liquor storeroom. This wall and room, along with the hole in the wall punched in by the police during the raid, still exist. It remained a venue for sample rooms until circa 1940.

The Minto Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Make your way back to Main Street and turn left.  Stop in front of the Capitol Theatre at 811 Main Street.  Your next site is directly across the street at 844 Main. 

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Albion Block (844-852 Main Street)

The Albion Block, built in 1892, consists of an Italianate three-storey commercial building constructed of red brick with a light-coloured freestone front façade. It is located midway between Robinson Street and Westmorland Street on the south side of Main Street.

Very few exterior elements of this structure are absent or altered from the original design by H. H. Mott of Saint John and contractor J. F. Teed of Dorchester. The freestone façade, decorated parapet and entablature and finished stone window openings are typical of the Italianate style. Although one of the oldest structures on Main Street today, its sound design and construction have allowed it to remain functional as a commercial and residential space.

The building was constructed for J. & S. Winter, coal merchants from Newfoundland who insisted on a first-class edifice for executing their business. Miss Hattie Tweedie, an influential member of the School Board for 47 years, operated a popular book and stationary store on the first floor from the late 1890’s until 1945.

The Albion Block was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue east, or to your left while facing the Albion Block.  Stop in front of 797 Main Street.  Your next site located at 828 Main Street will be directly across the street.

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Transcript Building (828 Main Street)

The Transcript Building is a brick two-storey Italianate building with a dominant three-storey capped tower. It is located on the southwest corner of Main and Robinson streets.

In 1897, newspaper owner and editor John T. Hawke purchased the land and built a wooden Transcript building. In 1900, he built this beautiful brick structure. He employed a corner entrance, a popular commercial aesthetic at the time.  The elevated stone foundation, the elaborate tower and the elegant arch details of the door and windows continue to enrich the overall streetscape.

Although not the first daily paper in Moncton, the Moncton Transcript offered a new, and often oppositional, source of information and editorial opinion. Among the editors of the Moncton Transcript paper, John T. Hawke was its most colourful. It is said that he would occasionally appear on the tower’s balcony to address the public directly, usually in opposition of the editorial stance of the rival Times newspaper. The Moncton Transcript, and later the amalgamated Moncton Times and Transcript, published its daily paper out of this location until relocating in 1960.

The Transcript Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue east, or to your left while facing the Transcript Building, to the intersection of Main and Church.  Cross to the opposite side of Church Street and turn left.  Proceed north up Church Street until you are directly across the street from St. James’ Gate, located at 14 Church Street.  This will be your stop for the next 2 sites. 

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14 Church Street

14 Church Street is a three-storey commercial building in red brick with a gable parapet on the front façade. It is located on the west side of Church Street, just north of Main Street.

The structure’s clean rectangular massing and geometrically inspired detailing hints of the Art Deco style of the 1930’s. The exterior design emulates that of the adjacent Salvation Army Citadel that was erected only a few years before.

When the original Globe Laundry facilities on the site were sold by Vail Bros. in 1898, a larger facility was erected in its place. Still operating under the name of Globe Laundry in 1928, Vail’s Star Laundry Company Limited sold the building to J. D. Creaghan Company Limited. A short time later, the wooden structure was expanded to its current size and the exterior brick was added. This newly renovated commercial building was ready for tenants such as dentist Lea Allanach, eye specialist W. A. Pullin and its most prominent tenant, Moyers School Supplies Ltd.

14 Church Street was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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Salvation Army Citadel (16 Church Street)

The Salvation Army Citadel is located on the west side of Church Street just north of Main Street. It consists of a two-storey red brick commercial structure.  Although the overall design of the building hints at both Moderne and Art Deco architecture, it maintains many traditional Salvation Army Citadel details used throughout the world, including the use of parapets and brick.

In 1898, the school buildings on the grounds of Central School were being sold at an auction. Mr. L. W. McAnn purchased one of the smaller school buildings, built in the 1880’s, and moved it from the St. George Street/Alma Street area to its current location on Church Street. During the move, McAnn sold the building to the Salvation Army for use as a barracks. When the organization grew, the barracks and an additional structure were deemed inadequate. In 1926, a building committee raised the funds and commissioned the Parsons-Ed Company to erect a new building. This new structure would incorporate the existing building. Instead of completely concealing the Colonial Revival style of the existing Salvation Army Barracks building, much of the original detail is still apparent at the rear of the citadel.

Having been established in Moncton since 1885, the Salvation Army’s contributions to Moncton’s social welfare, community life, spirituality and sense of charity date back nearly as far as the city itself.

The Salvation Army Citadel was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** While facing the Salvation Army Citadel, turn right, or north, and continue up Church Street, stopping at the intersection of Church and Queen (the corner without a church on it!)  This will be your stop for the next three sites.

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Central United Church (150 Queen Street)

Central United Church is a sandstone Gothic Revival church structure with a steeply pitched roof and a square bell tower. Located on the southwest corner of Church and Queen streets, it was built in 1916 on the site of the previous Methodist Church that was destroyed by fire in 1914.

Renowned architect Andrew Cobb of Halifax and contractor James Reid & Son of Moncton, under the direction of Rev. H. A. Goodwin and a Building Committee of many prominent businessmen in the city, began construction of the church in 1915. Construction was completed in 1916. To assist the congregation in re-building, Reverend Edward Savage of St. Bernard’s Roman Catholic Church donated the sandstone from his quarry in Notre-Dame. The structure contains a Greek cross sanctuary, an auditorium, classrooms and a square bell tower. Despite several small fires, the vaulted arch ceiling, coffering, moulded wooden trim and pews are original.

Formerly the Central Methodist Church, the new Central United Church grew from the first Protestant Church organized in the City of Moncton in 1847. The church and its impressive former manse building will continue to serve the citizens of Moncton as part of the Community Peace Centre, a centre for not-for-profit agencies in Moncton.

Central United Church was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law. 

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First Moncton United Baptist Church (50 Church Street)

First Moncton United Baptist Church is located on the northwest corner of Church Street and Queen Street. It is an early 20th century brown sandstone Gothic Revival church.

A building committee was created the night fire destroyed an original wooden church in 1913; the new stone church was completed in 1915. The committee hired C. B. Chapell of Prince Edward Island as the architect and Moncton’s James Reid & Son as the contractor. Their combined efforts resulted in a brown sandstone structure that is still one of the best examples of Gothic Revival architecture in the city. The interior design makes use of several pillar styles, coffered lathe ceilings and extensive wainscoting. The centerpiece of the chancel area is the coffer-paneled Casavant pipe organ.

The initial donations from the community following the fire in 1913 were not only from within the Baptist denomination; this spirit of community was apparent when, at the dedication of the new stone church, George O. Spencer, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, while accepting the building on behalf of the congregation, stated that the church was open “to all”. First Moncton United Baptist Church was first organized by Rev. Joseph Crandall in 1828 and has served the religious and community needs of Moncton ever since. This congregation has had a church building on this site since 1857.

First Moncton United Baptist Church was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law. 

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St. George’s Anglican Church (51 Church Street)

St. George’s Anglican Church is a Neo-Gothic cruciform sandstone church located on the northeast corner of Church and Queen streets.

This beautiful well-preserved example of religious Neo-Gothic architecture with a prominent square bell tower on its southwest corner was erected on the same site as two previous churches. When construction plans began in 1932, Archdeacon J. J. Alexander and the congregation commissioned C. A. Fowler of Halifax as the architect and Moncton’s Ambrose Wheeler as the contractor. When completed in 1935, the church became the third stone religious structure at the intersection of Church Street and Queen Street. When appreciated along with the two other stone churches at this intersection, St. George’s Anglican Church forms an integral part of one of the most architecturally significant areas in Moncton.

The congregation of St. George’s Anglican Church first held service in 1852. The second church structure that existed on this site was razed to make room for the current stone structure and was the oldest place of worship in Moncton at the time besides the Free Meeting House.

St. George’s Anglican Church was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law

*** While facing St. George’s Anglican Church, turn right or east, and continue along Queen Street to the corner of Queen and Alma.  Across Queen Street is your next site, the Masonic Temple

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Masonic Temple (115 Queen Street)

The Masonic Temple is a two-storey Neo-Classical structure of red brick with sandstone trim located on the northwest corner of Queen Street and Victoria Street.

Architect J. W. Frazer and contractor Ambrose Wheeler used Greek-inspired elements to create a clean and geometrically sound structure that was worthy of the Masons. The interior of lodge hall closely follows the traditional layout, design and décor dictated by the Masons.

The Masons are the oldest fraternal organization in Moncton, having been granted a dispensation by Provincial Grand Master Alexander Keith in 1853. When the Keith Lodge and the Tweedie Lodge amalgamated in 1921 to form Moncton Masonic Temple Limited, a new structure was designed to accommodate the increase in membership. Work was completed in 1924 under Superintendent of Work, Duncan Jonah. In 1940, an additional storey was added as part of a restoration after a fire. It serves local members of the Masonic Order to this day. Countless prominent businessmen and politicians have been members of Moncton Masonic Lodges over the past 150 years.

The Masonic Temple was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Stay on the corner of Queen and Alma streets and look up, waaay up, and you will see your next site, the Aliant Tower.

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Aliant Tower (corner of Botsford and Queen)

The Aliant Tower is the most distinguishable element of Moncton’s skyline.  Historically called the NBTel Tower and the Talking Tower, it consists of a 127 metre microwave tower constructed of reinforced concrete.

At the time of its completion in 1971, the Aliant Tower was the tallest microwave communications tower of its kind in North America. It remains the tallest structure in Moncton, dwarfing the nearby Assomption Place, the tallest office building in the province, by 46 metres. The tower was erected in a regional record 16 days of continuous concrete pouring, rising at a rate of 6.7m per day. It was designed by John Maryon International Limited of Toronto and built by Dineen Construction Limited of Toronto. Later, a second shell of concrete was necessary to ensure the stability of the structure.

The tower’s placement at the corner of Botsford Street and Queen Street is significant. The tower sits on the former site of Moncton’s first telephone exchange, which was started in 1883 by George C. Peters with five subscribers. In choosing Moncton as the location for this innovative tower, NBTel was accurately predicting where significant growth in the province would take place.

*** Crossing Alma Street, continue east along Queen Street.  At the intersection of Queen and Botsford, cross Queen Street until you reach the northwest corner of the intersection. The next site will be directly across Botsford Street. 

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St. Bernard’s Rectory (43 Botsford Street)

St. Bernard’s Rectory is a Norman-Gothic freestone rectory located alongside St. Bernard’s Church on the northeast corner of Botsford and Queen streets.

It was built between 1914 and 1915 by renowned René Arthur Fréchet and contractor T. D. LeBlanc. This two-storey stone residence and office consists of a main square structure with a crenellated tower on the southwest corner. The interior of the rectory contains many of its original elements. In 1962, architects LeBlanc, Gaudet, Roy and Siennes and contractor Thaddee Bourque & Son modernized the rectory and made the necessary changes to the neighbouring church’s sanctuary with respect to Vatican II.

St. Bernard’s Rectory was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Continue north up Botsford Street until you are directly across the street from your next site, St. Bernard’s Church. 

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St. Bernard’s Church (43 Botsford Street)

St. Bernard’s Church is a Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church located on the east side of Botsford Street, just north of Queen Street.

St. Bernard's Church is a significant example of Gothic Revival architecture in Moncton. Built between 1887 and 1891, it was the first masonry church building in Moncton. It continues to serve St. Bernard’s Parish, the first Roman Catholic parish in Moncton.

Under the congregation’s first pastor, Father Henry A. Meahan, architect George Fairweather and contractor Angus B. LeBlanc erected this gorgeous structure of quarry-faced freestone. In keeping with Gothic Revival architecture, almost every opening is a Gothic arch, and the extensive use of foil tracery is apparent. Vertical elements, such as a bell tower and spires help to break up the rectangular massing of the overall structure.

St. Bernard’s Church was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Directly behind you, you will find your next site, located at 62 Botsford Street. 

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Rand House (62 Botsford Street)

The Rand House is a mid-19th century two-storey Italianate residence located on the west side of Botsford Street, just north of Queen Street and across from St. Bernard’s Roman Catholic Church.

Built circa 1858 for businessman John Fawcett and his wife Mary on land purchased from Bliss Botsford, the Italianate style of the Rand House is a striking departure from much of Moncton’s residential architecture. The veranda arches, the truncated hipped roof and the wide eaves with brackets are all key features of this style.

Its second occupant was James McAllister, who bought the property in 1864. He became a prominent businessman through his association with prominent citizen Oliver Jones and with the Westmorland Bank. He later became involved in such endeavours as the building of the Irishtown Reservoir, becoming chairman of the School Board, serving as the first treasurer of the YMCA and being involved with the building of St. John’s Presbyterian Church. His wife, Margaret, was a high-standing member of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union.

The home later became the residence of Ivan C. Rand, a Moncton lawyer, a judge, New Brunswick’s Liberal Attorney-General and a Canadian Supreme Court Justice. His most notable contribution was as a federal arbitrator at the Canadian National Railroad. He developed a solution for labour disputes that would be dubbed the “Rand Formula”. This formula, still used by unions today, consisted of a compromise that saw non-union workers pay union fees but not have to join the union.

The Rand House was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

*** Make your way back to the intersection of Botsford and Queen streets.  Carefully cross Queen Street and then cross to the opposite side of Botsford Street.  Once you are safely in front of La Mine d’Or at 41 Botsford Street, proceed south on Botsford towards Main Street.  Stop when you are directly across the street from your next site at 18 Botsford Street.

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Times Building (18 Botsford Street)

The Times Building is a rectangular three-storey Italianate building located just north of Main Street on the west side of Botsford Street.

Designed by Saint John architect H. H. Mott and constructed by contractor G. O. Dunham in 1902, this structure has maintained many of the distinctive features of the Italianate style, such as its rectangular massing, the Roman arch door and window openings on the front façade and the wide cornices. Although the interior has been remodelled on several occasions, the original support pillars and large timber joists have been preserved. The unique butterfly roof and rough sandstone trimmings are still apparent on the exterior.

An earlier wooden structure was erected on the site in 1868 for the Moncton Times newspaper founders, Thaddeus Stevens and Jim Brewster. Destroyed by fire and replaced in 1902 by this brick building, it remained the home of the Moncton Times, the Moncton Daily Times and the Times Printing Company until 1945. At that time Moncton Times and rival Moncton Transcript papers were purchased by Moncton Publishers Ltd. The two papers were amalgamated and continue to operate as the Moncton Times and Transcript at another location.

The Times Building was designated as a Heritage Property under the City of Moncton’s Heritage By-Law.

*** Continue south, or to your left while facing the Times building, stopping at the corner of Botsford and Main.  This will be your stop for your final three sites. You are now standing at the southwest corner of the City Hall courtyard where the iTour began.

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Provincial Bank Building (696-698 Main Street)

The Provincial Bank Building is a three-storey brick and stone commercial building in the French Renaissance style that fronts Main Street. Commissioned in 1909 by the Provincial Bank of Canada to be its Maritime Provinces headquarters, this building was occupied by the bank from its opening in 1910 until 1973. It was the 5th bank to open in Moncton, signifying further economic and industrial growth for the city. Local architect René Arthur Frechet and contractor Philip N. LeBlanc completed the structure in less than 6 months. Although a new façade is now applied over the arched Cocagne freestone of the ground floor, the Roman arch brickwork of the second and third storeys remains the most notable example of the French Renaissance architecture in Moncton.

When the bank opened its doors to the public on February 8, 1910, it was the first commercial institution in Moncton to have a completely bilingual staff, signage, forms and other printed material. This was significant foresight, as Moncton would become the first officially bilingual city in Canada 92 years later.

The Provincial Bank Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law. 

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McSweeney Building (700 Main Street)

The McSweeney Building is a three-storey, stone and brick Italianate commercial structure that was constructed in 1901. When this building was designed by J. C. Dumaresq and built by local contractor T. D. LeBlanc, it was the first true department store in Moncton. It also contained the first electric passenger elevator in the area, attracting crowds from as far away as Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Senator Peter McSweeney was involved in the creation of the Red and Green tag campaign. This bargain day campaign was planned around times of the year when tides allowed travelers by boat to arrive in the morning and leave in the evening.

The arched window openings and decorative masonry details of the three-storey façade of stone and Milton Pressed Bricks are almost completely original. Although it was designed as a department store with an open concept for the Peter McSweeney Company, Ltd., details of the subsequent government offices, court chambers and utilities that occupied this building from the 1930’s to the 1970’s are readily apparent. Original wooden columns between floors support the entire structure, making the interior walls principally ornamental. The full-height classical pilasters and the ornate parapet on the roof continue to enhance the overall aesthetic of Main Street.

The McSweeney Building was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

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Jordi Bonet Mural (720-730 Main Street)

The Jordi Bonet Mural, also known as the Rubin’s Ltd. Mural, is an abstract ceramic tile mural located on the former Rubin’s Ltd. clothing store on Main Street.  The mural spans the upper floors of the north façade and continues along a portion of the west façade of the building.

This mural was commissioned by the Rubin brothers in 1962 for the façade of their newly renovated department store. Entitled “Explosion”, this is Moncton’s only public installation of renowned Quebec artist, Jordi Bonet and remains one of the largest pieces of ceramic work of this type in eastern Canada. Jordi Bonet, who was a native of Barcelona, Spain, spent the final 25 years of his life in Quebec, before succumbing to leukemia in 1979 at the age of 47. His ceramic, cement, bronze and aluminum murals that proliferated the globe caught the attention of contemporaries such as Salvador Dali. Although much of his work was in sacred and liturgical art, the mural in Moncton is an example of one of Bonet’s secular commissions. Having lost an arm at an early age, Bonet rented a local warehouse to map out and number the tiles on the floor. The pieces were installed by local tile experts Corazza Terazzo Co. Ltd.

Since its unveiling, this mural has been an integral part of Moncton’s streetscape. 

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