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Frequently Asked Questions

1. How is it determined what road or sidewalk is plowed first?
2. Why is it taking so long for crews to plow my street?
3. Why did you plow my street twice during the same storm?
3. I live on a corner and I always get more snow from your plows than others on my street.
5. My neighbor across the street pushes snow onto the roadway or across the road onto my side of the street causing the road to build up with ice. Can something be done to prevent this?
6. Why are the snow removal crews working when it is not snowing?
7. The City's snow operations equipment damaged my lawn will it be fixed?
8. Whenever you plow my street, you block all the driveway entrances. Is there not some way to avoid leaving  snow in driveway entrances, or remove it after the plow has passed?
9. At what point do snow removal crews move into action?
10. What is the priority and deployment strategy?
11. How long does it take to clear the roads of snow?
12. Where does the City of Moncton put the snow?
13. When does the overnight parking ban come in to effect?
14. How can I inform the City of potholes or other road deficiencies?  

 

Snow Removal

 

1. How is it determined what road or sidewalk is plowed first?

The City of Moncton has a defined Snow Route, which must be maintained during winter operations.  This includes all main thoroughfares within the city including streets at police stations, fire stations and hospitals. These routes are used by emergency vehicles to respond to emergencies. Once street plowing operations are underway, the sidewalk plows are dispatched to start on sidewalk cleaning operations with priority given to downtown areas as well as integrated sidewalks, sidewalks on main thoroughfares, hospitals and schools, as per the sidewalk snow plan.

A Snow Removal Committee was formed to review the City’s plan for street and sidewalk snow removal.  The committee developed the following criteria to ensure the highest level of snow removal along with the most equitable criteria for snow removal throughout Moncton:

  • Both sidewalks on Arterial and Collector Roads will be plowed.
  • One sidewalk on local primary roads will be plowed
  • Local minor roads are excluded except for those that are grandfathered
  • Ensuring connectivity and school zone safety remain important criteria

 

Arterial Roads

Collector Roads

Local Primary Roads

Local Minor Roads

Mountain

Hildegard

Camelot

Clair Crescent

Morton

Killam

North

Don Crescent

Main

Evergreen

Grant

Franklyn

Road definitions:

Arterial roads: Roads with the most traffic in the city, these roads typically have traffic volumes over 10 000 vehicles per day.  Examples: Mountain Road, Main Street,  Assomption, Vaughan Harvey, Morton Ave, Lewisville Rd, Elmwood Dr, McLaughlin, Salisbury.

Collector roads: A roadway which collects traffic and feed it into the arterial roads, these roads essentially connect local streets to primary streets. Collector roads typically have traffic volumes between 2 000 and 10 000 vehicles per day.  Examples: Bessborough, Evergreen, Frampton, Hennessey, Glengrove, Kendra, Pleasant, Purdy, Westmont, Worthington, Collishaw, Connaught, Donald, Gordon, Hildegard, Queen, St George

Local primary roads : The main roads in subdivisions, these roads typically have traffic volumes below 2 000 vehicles per day.  Examples:  Ayer, Barrieau, Bonaccord, Centennial, Churchill, Drummond, Elmhurst, Fairview Knoll, Glenwood, Hopper, Jones, Noel, Queen Mary, Wynwood

Local minor roads: The roads with the least traffic in the city. Road that's typically used to get to one's house within a subdivision, typically traffic volumes are below 500 vehicles per day.  As such, this type of road will not be plowed unless grandfathered.

The 1st priority is Arterial Streets, 2nd priority is collector streets and 3rd priority is urban local primary streets.

 

2. Why is it taking so long for crews to plow my street?

All plows have a starting point. They first must do their respective main thoroughfares and then start plowing their subdivision. It takes each plow close to four hours to do a section. It could be that you are closer to the end of the plow’s section. 

3. Why did you plow my street twice during the same storm?

Depending on the length and severity of a snowstorm, a street could be plowed several times after the initial pass. More snow could have fallen, or it could be a simple clean-up of areas where cars or other obstructions had prevented proper clean-up initially.

4. I live on a corner and I always get more snow from your plows than others on my street.

There is more open road surface at an intersection than on a straight stretch of street. Therefore, while cleaning an intersection, more snow will be collected and pushed to the side of the street.

5. My neighbor across the street pushes snow onto the roadway or across the road onto my side of the street causing the road to build up with ice. Can something be done to prevent this?

The City of Moncton has a by-law stating that no one can push or place snow onto the roadway or sidewalk. This can be reported to the City of Moncton operations center at 859-2643 and someone will investigate.

6. Why are the snow removal crews working when it is not snowing?

Clean up crews work between storms to haul and widen streets in preparation for upcoming storms.

7. The city’s snow operations equipment damaged my lawn will it be fixed?

During snow clearing events, lawns and boulevards are sometimes damaged. If damage occurs, a report needs to be sent to the City of Moncton operations center (859-2643). The location where the damage occurred will be placed on our list for spring repairs.

8. Whenever you plow my street, you block all the driveway entrances. Is there not some way to avoid leaving snow in driveway entrances, or remove it after the plow has passed?

When plowing snow, the snow is pushed to the right hand side of the roadway to the curb or ditch as not to impede traffic flow. The cost and manpower it would take to clean all driveways within the City of Moncton would be prohibitive.

9. At what point do snow removal crews move into action?

In advance of winter storms and when conditions allow, a salt brine anti-icing solution is applied to city streets, which allows snow to be removed more efficiently. When streets become slippery, our ten salt trucks are dispatched to spread salt over the entire city which is divided into ten salt zones. Once this operation starts, crews are dispatched to their designated areas to start salting the main routes, followed by residential areas. When sufficient amount of snow has fallen to warrant plowing of streets city, plows and contractors equipment are called to begin clearing of streets.

This operation requires ten City plow trucks, two City graders and six City loaders , plus 26 pieces of private equipment consisting of two graders and 24 loaders with plow and wing. There are also three private plow trucks for a total 48 pieces of plow equipment used to plow city streets.

Crews strive to plow all streets to their travelled width within 8 hours of storm end. A couple of hours after the street plows have been working, our 13 sidewalk plows start clearing sidewalks. The downtown, main city arteries, areas around schools and hospitals as a first priority. This operation will continue until the snow event is over and the streets are clear.

10. What is the priority and deployment strategy?

As snow flurries begin, salting begins, starting with the city snow routes followed by subdivisions and side streets. After an accumulation of five to ten centimeters, the street plows will be called in to commence plowing. The snow route is completed first, followed by all other streets within each plowing zone. The eleven sidewalk plows will be called a couple of hours later and they will start their zones, which include: schools, hospitals and main streets. They will then complete the sidewalks in their respective zone.

11. How long does it take to clear the roads of snow?

It takes three to four hours too plow a zone and, depending on the severity of the storm, it could take a little longer. Crews strive to plow all streets to their travelled width within 8 hours of storm end. With a normal snow event of fifteen centimeters or less, all roads should be plowed once and some of the first streets that were plowed should be cleaned a second time. After the plowing is completed, some additional salting may be required to clean a few remaining spots.

12. Where does the City of Moncton put the snow?

The City of Moncton operates three snow dumps: the first is at the old landfill at the causeway traffic circle. This dump is used exclusively for snow being hauled from city parking lots, bus shelters and city streets. The second snow dump is located at the back of the Moncton Coliseum parking lot and is used only for snow that falls in the Coliseum parking lot; snow from city streets is not hauled to this location. The third snow dump is located on Berry Mills Road.  This dump is used for some snow from city streets as well as private lots within the City of Moncton providing they have a permit that allows them to dump at this location. Permits may be purchased at City Hall.

13. When does the overnight parking ban come in to effect?

The overnight parking ban comes into effect on December 1st and remains in effect until April 15th from Midnight until 7:00 am.  This ban also affects city- owned parking lots unless you have a monthly parking permit. 

14. How can I inform the City of potholes or other road deficiencies?

All inquiries, complaints or concerns may be made to the City of Moncton Operation center located at 100 Worthington Avenue, which is across from the Coliseum parking lot. The 24-hour line is 859-2643.